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Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis

WHAT IS FUNCTIONAL BLOOD CHEMISTRY ANALYSIS?

“There is no general screening test that is more efficient, effective and affordable than a comprehensive blood chemistry panel. A comprehensive blood chemistry panel will allow the healthcare provider to quickly assess the degree of health or disease in a patient. It is the ultimate tool in biomedical laboratory sciences to evaluate new patients. It allows the healthcare provider to establish a baseline of biomarkers that can be used to track the patient’s health immediately and over a period of time”. Datis Kharrazian, DC, MS, FAACP, DACBN, DIBAK, CNS, CSCS, CCSP

A comprehensive blood chemistry panel will allow our office to quickly assess your degree of health or disease. It allows us to establish a baseline of biomarkers that can be used to track your health immediately and over a period of time. Functional Blood Chemistry allows our office to...

  • To help the doctor determine which nutritional and homeopathic products are appropriate for your individual needs.
  • To implement nutritional programs designed to return your body to its natural healthy state.
  • To provide early detection of developing life-threatening health conditions.
  • To avoid spending money on products that you may not need.
  • It is an inexpensive way to track the results of your nutritional program. Follow-up tests allow you to chart the effectiveness of your program and make precise adjustments when needed.
  • By leveling your blood chemistry values within the optimum ranges, your immune system will function better, you will process and absorb nutrients more efficiently and enjoy a more vibrant state of health!
  • Determine functional and pathological laboratory patterns
  • Use nutritional and herbal compounds that can be used to support abnormal functional patterns that may lead to disease.
  • Refer for further diagnostic testing, additional therapies or medications when necessary.
  • Follow up with repeat testing to assess the effectiveness of treatment.

UNDERSTANDING BLOOD CHEMISTRY PRINCIPALS

Blood chemistry analysis is fundamentally about identifying patterns and relationships between tests to ascertain probabilities. Blood chemistry analysis should always be used in conjunction with a comprehensive medical history that includes past and present illnesses, medication usage, alcohol consumption, herbal and nutritional usage and adequate hydration. Blood chemistry analysis should be analyzed in conjunction with a detailed medical history (as well as Metabolic, Neurotransmitter and other health surveys) and physical examination.

PATHOLOGICAL VERSUS FUNCTIONAL RANGES

A pathological range is used to diagnose disease. A functional range is used to assess risk for disease before disease develops. The main difference between the functional and pathological range is the degree deviation allowed within their normal ranges. For example, the functional range for glucose is 85-100, the pathological range is 65-110. Levels above the pathological range may indicate diabetes. Levels above the functional range may indicate insulin resistance and future risk for developing diabetes. If biomarkers can be managed before they fall within the pathological range, preventive medicine can be practiced. Traditional healthcare providers usually do not embrace the concept of a functional range. Our office embraces the importance of functional blood chemistry ranges in the analysis of your blood chemistry tests and our focus is on improving your diet, nutrition and implimenting any necessary lifestyle changes.

DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY TESTING:

A full range of in-office laboratory testing is available to our patients through:

  • Quest Diagnostics Laboratories
    Full Range of Blood Testing
  • LabCorp
    Full Range of Blood Testing
  • Diagnos-Techs, Inc.
    Hormone Testing, Adrenal Stress Testing, Bone Health, Yeast and Gastrointestinal Panels
  • ALCAT Laboratories **(see clinical studies below)
    Food Sensitivities, Food Additive, Environmental and Pharmacoactive Agents Panels
  • BioHealth Laboratories
    Adrenal, Hormones and Gastrointestinal Panels
  • DBS Labs in conjection with NeuroResearch
    Neurotransmitter and Monoamine Transport Optimization Programs
  • and more...

Clinical References...

1. ALCAT Food Sensitivities References

Cellular Responses to Food in Irritable Bowel Syndrome – an Investigation of the ALCAT Test

Peter J. Fell MD, Sally Soulsby SRN, Jonathan Brostoff MD DM DSc FRCP FRCPath

Conclusion: A double Blind, placebo controlled study on 20 patients demonstrated that an ALCAT based elimination diet dramatically improved symptoms of IBS and had a statistically significant correlation between an ALCAT score and symptom provocation.

Summary: Twenty patients were selected with a minimum three (3) year history of IBS who had been fully investigated through endoscopy and barium enemas showing no major pathology. Skin tests for allergy were performed and positives confirmed by RAST. A 50 food ALCAT Test was performed on each patient.

The study was double-blind with respect to food challenge in that those foods deemed by the tests to be negative and positive were randomly assigned to the challenge periods. The technician performing the test randomly selected three positive foods on ALCAT and three negative foods. These were mixed and allocated to the patient's number. The patients, physician and nurses monitoring the study were not involved in the randomization. A two week initial elimination diet based on ALCAT results was followed by six single one week food challenges, (three positive and three negative) with randomly assigned foods. After this, a six week exclusion diet was implemented based on the original ALCAT prediction with inclusion of any negative foods from the challenge period.

The clinical scores were analyzed for the initial two week elimination period, the six individual food challenges and the final six week exclusion period. As a result of analyzing symptom scores of 120 separate double-blind food challenges using an analysis of variance, 43 out of 60 positive foods on the ALCAT produced symptoms whereas 11 out of 60 negative foods produced symptoms, which is statistically significant (p< =0·5). We have been able to show specific food sensitivities in a group of patients with IBS using an objective in vitro cellular technique. Eliminating the positive foods from the diet as defined by changes measured by the ALCAT test, two-thirds of the patients improved within two weeks. However, at 18 months follow up, the success rate had fallen to 50% of the patients being symptom free. On the basis of 120 separate double blind food challenges 72% accurately correlated with a positive and 81% with a negative test.

Published in: Journal of Nutritional Medicine, Volume 2, Number 2, 1991
Peer Reviewed Confirmation: Inside front cover of source journal: “Journal of Nutritional Medicine is an international peer review quarterly medical journal presenting original research and reports of clinical practice in the application of nutrition to medical treatment.”

Gastrointestinal Complaints Related to Diet

Douglas H. Sandberg MD

Conclusion: Three closely monitored case studies demonstrated that an ALCAT Based elimination plan coupled with titration skin testing was an effective method in alleviating symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders.

Summary: The link between gastrointestinal disorders and sensitivities to foods is discussed in detail as well as the difficulties in assessing these food sensitivities in individuals suffering from gastrointestinal disorders including: Infantile colic, post enteritis syndrome, transient gluten intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, chronic ulcerative colitis, recurrent abdominal pain, chronic constipation, Intussusception, migraine related GI symptoms and eosinophilic gastroenteritis.
The investigator presented a study involving 3 case reports of gastrointestinal complaints related to diet in which the ALCAT test was very beneficial. Certain GI disorders are now accepted as related to sensitivity to food components. Diagnosis and treatment of food sensitivity related illness has been a cumbersome and imperfect process. Use of a combination of the ALCAT test, and titration skin testing is suggested as a more efficient and an effective approach to these disorders.

Published in: International Pediatrics Volume 5, Number 1, 1990

Peer Reviewed Confirmation: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijped/

“International Journal of Pediatrics is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of pediatric research.”

The Effect of The ALCAT Test Diet Therapy for Food Sensitivity in Patient’s With Obesity

Mohammed Akmal, Saeed Ahmed Khan, Abdul Qayyum Khan

Summary: A group of 27 obese patients who had difficulty losing weight when they adhered to a reduced calorie diet were evaluated for specific white blood cell food induced reactions.

Patients were exhibiting multiple symptoms including: obesity, gastrointestinal reflux, chronic fatigue, headache and other chronic disorders associated with food sensitivities.

Baselines measurements were taken for each patient including body weight, total body fat percent and Body Mass Index. A 100 food ALCAT Test was performed on each patient. A 12 week elimination diet was constructed using The ALCAT Results (removing the test positive foods).

Twelve weeks after following the ALCAT diet plans, we observed a significant decrease in Body weight, Total Body fat percent and Body Mass Index. Body weight was decreased significantly from 91.37 ± 10.56 to 74.6 ± 6.76 kg, Total Body fat % was decreased significantly from 37.1 ± 7.16 to 27.66 ± 6.52 % and Body Mass Index was significantly decreased from 32.1 ± 3.8 to 26.1 ± 2.63 kg/m2.

In this study, we demonstrated the beneficial role of ALCAT test in obesity. Correlations between obesity and ALCAT test results were positive and significant in these patients. All these patients had difficulty losing weight when they adhered to a reduced calorie diet; this study confirmed a greater weight loss in patients when they were placed on a diet plan according to the ALCAT test results. Also, the weight loss was mostly fat. Other interesting observations included, a better sense of well being and improved physical performance, improvement in abdominal bloating and digestive problems.

Published in: Middle East Journal of Family Medicine, April 2009, Volume 7, Issue 3

Peer Reviewed Confirmation: http://www.mejfm.com/about_mejfm.htm
“The Middle East Journal of Family Medicine (MEJFM) is a new peer-reviewed journal to meet the needs of scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and the patients and communities they serve in the Middle-East.”

Alcat test results in the treatment of e respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms, arthritis, skin and central nervous system.

Danuta Mylek

Conclusion: The 72 patients that followed an ALCAT based elimination diet had significant improvement in their symptoms. Improvement was noted in 83% of arthritis patients, 75% of Urticaria, bronchitis, and gastroenteritis patients, 70% of migraine patients, 60% of chronic fatigue syndrome patients, 50% of asthma patients, 49% of AD patients, 47% of rhinitis patients and 32% of hyperactivity patients. Patients were also skin tested for IgE allergy to inhalants and foods which were more pronounced in skin and nasal symptoms.

Summary: ALCAT Test results were used as the basis for constructing an elimination diet treatment where food allergy or sensitivity may be suspected for 72 patients. Symptoms included AD, migraine headaches, abdominal pains, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, rhinitis, bronchitis, edema, arthritis, urticaria, asthma, hyperactivity and chronic fatigue syndrome. All patients had been unsuccessfully treated with standard therapeutic modalities (antibiotics, steroids, sedatives, ointments and dietary regiments).

A 50 food ALCAT Test was performed on each patient as well as a skin prick test to 11 common inhalants and 28 foods. A detailed history was documented for each patient. A 4 week elimination diet was constructed using The ALCAT Results (removing the test positive foods). Patients with hyperactivity and chronic fatigue syndrome were assessed after a 4 month elimination period.

Total improvement was observed in of 83% of arthritis patients, 75% of Urticaria, bronchitis, and gastroenteritis patients, 70% of migraine patients, 60% of chronic fatigue syndrome patients, 50% of asthma patients, 49% of AD patients, 47% of rhinitis patients and 32% of hyperactivity patients.

IgE-mediated mechanism (SPT positive) was noted in 35% of patients (inhalants and foods), 12% (only inhalants) and 9% (only food). In AD and rhinitis, SPTs were
positive in 57% of those patients. In 43% SPT were negative. SPTs in arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine and Urticaria patients were negative.
This study gives evidence that an elimination diet, based on a non-invasive, in vitro ALCAT Test results, improves symptoms in 50-83% of patients, who could not
improve on pharmacological treatment. The best results were obtained in migraine, arthritis, but worse on AD and rhinitis. SPT with inhalant are more often noted in skin and nasal symptoms, which are more exposed to inhalants and other harmful external factors.

Published in: Advances in Medical Sciences

Formerly Roczniki Akademii Medycznej w Bia?ymstoku Volume 40, Number 3, 1995

Peer Reviewed Confirmation: www.advms.pl (see attached document titled S18984002_Editorial_Policy.PDF)

“Advances in Medical Sciences is a peer-reviewed, international, scientific Journal, that publishes full-length articles on medical sciences.”

Rational management of food intolerance in an elite soccer club.

Fabrizio Angelini, Fulvio Marzatico, Gianluca Stesina, Luca Stefanini, Alessandro Bonuccelli, Daniela Buonocore, Sara Rucci, Fabrizio Tencone

Summary: This study examined eight (8) male soccer players who had an BMI average score of 24.9 ± 1.1 (Average ± DS) with symptoms of possible food intolerance (gastralgia, headache, intestinal meteorism, diarrhea, constipation, nausea) of an Italian Serie A soccer team.

Each subject was subjected to the ALCAT test before and after eight months of a personalized nutritional treatment. The athletes body composition was basally valued at the beginning and at the end of the study. The athletes tested, with food intolerance symptoms, were ALCAT test variously positive. The personalized nutritional treatment based on moderation rather than on drastic elimination of reactive foods and complying with the specific nutritional needs of the elite soccer player led to a nearly complete resolution of the first symptoms as the clinical evaluation and the post-treatment ALCAT test results demonstrate. Parallel to these results a significant shift of the mean impedance vector was observed (Hotelling T2 test, p < 0.0001), so indicating a more favorable condition of the soft tissues (hydration and/or mass) with no BMI variation (p<0.05).

The ALCAT test seems to be able to detect the food intolerance reactions when it is applied to patients with initial specific symptoms. A personalized and flexible nutritional therapy based on moderation and rational elimination of reactive foods seems to be working and be suitable for the elite athlete whose specific logistic necessities ( for example long travels) discourage the classic dietary regime. An efficient handling of the food intolerances seems to lead to a nutritional condition improvement, maybe reducing the concerned inflammatory situation as observed in body composition changing, which may influence the sports performance.

Published in: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2011, Volume 8 (Supplement 1)

Peer Reviewed Confirmation: http://www.jissn.com/about/reviewers

“Submitted manuscripts are usually reviewed by two or more experts. Peer reviewers will be asked to recommend whether a manuscript should be accepted, revised orrejected.”

Evaluation of ALCAT Test results in the non IgE-mediated pathology of the skin.

D'Amici M, Berardi L, Castello M, Mantegna G, Giunta V, Ronzi G, Vignini M.

Background- Specific foods can induce cutaneous reactions, including allergies that involve an abnormal immunologic reaction to food proteins or food intolerance which is not immunological in nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether food intolerance is associated with cutaneous reactions, and evaluate the diagnostic value of the ALCAT test in food intolerance.

Method- Thirty-five patients (22 females, 13 males, median age 41.5 years) affected by cutaneous reactions, such as urticaria, angioedema, itching and dermatitis consequent to food ingestion were tested by ALCAT. Patients also answered a survey regarding a tailored (diet based on ALCAT results) 2 month elimination diet. Clinical evaluation was also performed considering the symptom score before and after the diet (0–10), everyday conditioning (0–10), dietary changes (0–10), improvement symptoms after diet (1 = nothing; 2 = mild; 3 = very important). The ALCAT test electronically measures volumetric shifts in blood cells following incubation with food antigens. The degree of reactivity was determined by comparing a baseline distribution curve against the distribution curve generated by the analysis of each test agent/blood sample and calculating the absolute differences between curves and the standard deviation (SD). Any reactivity under 2 SD was considered non-reactive and these foods were allowed in diet. Quantitative parameters were reported as medians (md) and 1st–3rd quartiles (IQR). The Wilcoxon and the Kruskal–Wallis test were performed. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Result - Sixty-six percent of patients exhibited a very important improvement in symptoms, 31% mild improvement and 3% no change. The symptom score before diet changed among improvements symptoms score, but the difference was not significant (P = 0.07). Moreover, dietary changes significantly changed (P = 0.001) among improvements symptoms score; in particular, higher values of dietary changes were associated with large improvements. Finally, difference between symptom score before (md:7; IQR:6–8) and after diet (md:4; IQR:3–6) was significant (P = 0.0001).

Conclusion - The study provides evidence that an elimination diet based on ALCAT test results improves symptoms in 66% of patients. Mild improvements should be considered the result of patient subjectivity (placebo effect) and the benefits resulting from proper nutrition. In conclusion, we demonstrate the beneficial role of ALCAT test.

30th Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 11-15 June 2011 - Istanbul, Turkey

Allergy Volume 66, Supplement s94, June 2011 – pg. 63, abstract 553
http://www.eaaci.org/organization/committees/scien...

“The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonization of EAACI Congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings.”

ALCAT test results in the treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms.

Berardi L, De Amici M, Castello M, Torre C, Giunta V, Legoratto S, Vignini M

Background - Specific foods and certain additives can induce adverse gastrointestinal (GI) reactions. Food intolerance in the absence of specific digestive enzymes is the result of toxic by-products from undigested foods that induce GI symptoms different from allergic symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether food intolerance is associated with GI disease.

Method - Forty-eight patients (pts) (37 females, 11 males, median age 38.5 years) affected by GI symptoms were tested by ALCAT. Pts also answered a survey regarding a tailored (diet based on ALCAT results) 2 month elimination diet. Clinical evaluation was also performed, considering the symptom score before and after initiating the diet (0–10), everyday conditions (score 0–10), dietary changes (0–10) and symptom improvement after the diet (1 = nothing; 2 = mild; 3 = very important). The ALCAT test electronically measures volumetric shifts in blood cells following incubation with food antigens. The degree of reactivity was determined by comparing a baseline distribution curve against the distribution curve generated by the analysis of each test agent/blood sample and calculating the absolute differences between curves and the standard deviation (SD). Any reactivity under 2 SD was considered non-reactive and these foods were allowed in the diet. Quantitative parameters were reported as medians (md) and 1st–3rd quartiles (IQR). The Wilcoxon and the Kruskal–Wallis tests were performed. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Result - Seventy-one percent of pts exhibited a very important improvement in symptoms, 27% mild improvement and 2% no change. The symptom score before starting the diet (P = 0.0042), dietary changes (P = 0.0003) and everyday conditions score (P = 0.0015) significantly changed with regard to symptom improvement score. In particular, higher values in dietary changes score, everyday conditions score and symptom score were associated with large improvements. Finally, the difference between symptom score before (md: 6.5; IQR: 6–8) and after the diet (md: 4; IQR: 3–5) was significant (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion - The study provides evidence that an elimination diet based on ALCAT results improves symptoms in 71% of pts. In particular, symptom improvements were most evident in patients with higher symptom scores, dietary changes and everyday conditions.

30th Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 11-15 June 2011 - Istanbul, Turkey

Allergy Volume 66, Supplement s94, June 2011 – pg. 63, abstract 552

http://www.eaaci.org/organization/committees/scien...

“The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonization of EAACI Congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings.”

Alcat test identifies food intolerance in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

Berardi L, De Amici M, Vignini A, Mantegna G, Mosca M

Background - Specific foods and food additives can induce adverse gastrointestinal (GI) reactions, including food allergies that involve an abnormal immunologic reaction to food proteins or food intolerance which is not immunological in nature. Food intolerance in the absence of specific digestive enzymes is the result of toxic by-products from undigested foods that induce GI symptoms different from allergic symptoms.

Method - Food allergies were investigated by two specific tests: rast and the prick test. Food tolerance tests vary in mechanism and reproducibility. The ALCAT test is a new assay for food intolerance that utilizes electronic hematology instrumentation and computerized data analysis to measure volumetric shifts in white blood cells after antigen exposure.

Result - A group of 15 patients (4 males and 11 females) affected by GI symptoms and negative for allergies (prick and/or rast) agreed to be tested with the alcat test. Patients in therapy with systemic corticosteroids, antihistamines and anticoagulants were excluded. After two months we evaluated the effects of the elimination diet which was based on the results of the ALCAT test. We lost three patients during follow-up, in 54% of the remaining subjects symptoms improved significantly while 46% showed no change.

Conclusion - The ALCAT test appears efficacious in detecting food intolerance however unfortunately we did not test whether this improvement was durable and we cannot rule out a placebo effect.

28th Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 6-10 June 2009 – Warsaw, Poland

Allergy Volume 64, Supplement 90, 2009 – pg. 490, abstract 1280

http://www.eaaci.org/organization/committees/scien...

“The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonization of EAACI Congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings.”

Food intolerance in patients with cutaneous diseases: diagnostic value of the alcat test.

Berardi L, De Amici M, Vignini A, Torre C, Mosca M

Background - The aim of this study was to evaluate whether food intolerance is associated with cutaneous diseases, such as Chronic Urticaria and Angioedema, and itching and dermatitis, and to evaluate the diagnostic value of Alcat testing in food intolerance.

Method - The Alcat test electronically measures volume shifts in peripheral blood cells following incubation with food antigens. Results were expressed in terms of percent change for cell volume and number.

Result - A group of twenty patients (13 females and seven males) affected by cutaneous diseases, and presenting with Chronic Urticaria (1%), itching (2%) or Dermatitis (17%), with negative allergic tests (prick and/or rast) were Alcat tested. No subject was currently treated with systemic corticosteroids, antihistamines and anticoagulants. We lost six patients during follow-up, the remaining subjects were Alcat tested and answered a survey regarding a tailored (diet based on alcat results) 2 months elimination diet. 86% exhibited a dramatic improvement in symptoms, while 14% showed no change or did not follow the diet.

Conclusion - The Alcat test appears to have diagnostic value in detecting food intolerance but controlled randomized studies with longer follow-up are necessary to confirm the clinical value of the Alcat test.

28th Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 6-10 June 2009 – Warsaw, Poland

Allergy Volume 64, Supplement 90, 2009 – pg. 490, abstract 1281

http://www.eaaci.org/organization/committees/scien...

“The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonization of EAACI Congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings.”

Evaluation of neopterin and ALCAT test in patients with food intolerance.

De Amici M, Berardi L, Vignini M, Torre C, Castello M, Giunta V, Ciprandi G

Background - Specific foods and food additives can induce adverse gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous reactions, including food allergies that involve an abnormal immunologic reaction to food proteins or food intolerance which is not pathogenetically immune-mediated. Neopterin is synthesized by human monocyte-derived macrophages upon stimulation with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Measurement of neopterin concentrations is useful for monitoring cell-mediated immune activation as there is a positive direct relationship between neopterin levels and severity of immune-mediated disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neopterin serum levels in a group of patients with food intolerance.

Method - A group of forty-six patients (40 females, 6 males, median age 33 years) affected by cutaneous disease (27%) or GI symptoms (73%) consequent to food ingestion were tested by ALCAT and neopterin serum levels were measured. The ALCAT test utilizes electronic haematology instrumentation and computerized data analysis to measure volumetric shifts in peripheral blood cells following incubation with food antigens. Results are expressed in terms of percent change for cell volume and number. The degree of reactivity was determined by comparing a baseline distribution curve (of WBC) against the distribution curve generated by the analysis of each test agent/blood sample, and calculating the absolute differences between the curves and the standard deviation (SD). Any reactivity under 2 SD was considered non-reac tive (negative) and these foods are allowed in the diet. The Neopterin-MW EIA kit (DRG Instruments GmbH) employed an enzyme immunoassay technique to measure neopterin in a serum sample and was performed according to the Manufacturer’s Instructions and expressed as ng/mL. Neopterin values were reported as medians with first and third quartiles (interquartile range). ALCAT test data were described as a percentage of non-reactive foodstuffs. Correlation between neopterin serum levels and percentage of non-reactive food was evaluated by means of the Spearman’s correlation coefficient (r).

Result - The neopterin median value was 2 ng/mL (25th–75th: 1.50–2.25 ng/mL). There was a significant positive relationship between neopterin serum levels and percentage of non-reactive foodstuffs (P = 0.05, r = 0.302).

Conclusion - This preliminary study confirms that food intolerance is not provoked by immunological mechanisms.

29th Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 5-9 June 2010 – London, UK

Allergy Volume 65, Supplement 92, 2010 – pg. 415-416, abstract 1105

http://www.eaaci.org/organization/committees/scien...

“The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonization of EAACI Congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings.”

Diagnostic value of ALCAT test in intolerance to food additives compared with double blind placebo controlled (DBPC) oral challenges.

Lene Hoi MD

The purpose of this study was to define the potential usefulness of the ALCAT test in evaluating intolerance to food additives. 92 patients, 52 females and 40 moles with a median age of 34 yrs (range: 3-80 yrs) suffering from alimentary intolerance including asthma, perennial rhinitis, urticaria, atopic dermatitis, migraine and irritable colon, were investigated by Alcat test for food and brought into remission on individual diets also eliminating food additives. The methods used were in vitro computer based cellular Alcat test against 10 common food preservatives (FA) and 10 food colourants (FC) performed on circulating leucocytes in whole blood. The DBPCOC challenges with opaque capsules [ALK, DK) containing the additives and placebo were applied as standard according to this design: 76 challenges were performed in 26 patients, randomly selected among the Alcat tested patients, and each patient was challenged with 1 reactive antigen, 1 nonreactive, and 1 placebo. In vitro 2 patients were not reacting to any antigen. The results are given in the table.

Conclusively, the Alcat test seems to provide a high efficiency in detecting food additive intolerance with few false positives as well as few false negatives, and it deserves further studies on a larger material.

52nd annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; March 15-20, 1996, New Orleans, LA

15th World Congress of Asthmology; April 24-27, 1996, Munksgaard, Copenhagen

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Volume 97, Issue 1, Part 3, January 1996 – pg. 336

European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Volume 51, Number 30, Supplement 1996

High Correlation of the ALCAT Test Results with Double Blind Challenge (DBC) in Food Sensitivity.

Fell PJ, Brostoff J, Pasula M

The ALCAT Test reproducibly measures volumetric shifts in the white blood cells upon incubation with antigens. This study was designed to assess the degree of correlation between ALCAT and the results of oral DBC with the same foods. Nineteen symptomatic patients (IBS, atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, or migraine headaches) with evidence of food sensitivity were ALCAT tested to each of 50 food extracts. Each subject was given diary cards to score (0-4) symptoms daily over an 8-week period. In the first 2 weeks, all ALCAT positive foods plus 3 ALCAT-negative foods were eliminated from the diet to determine the degree of symptom remission possible. In each of the subsequent 6 weeks, a new food was introduced randomly in DBC, several portions eaten daily for the week; three of the foods were ALCAT-positive and 3 were ALCAT-negative.

Symptom scores for each week were averaged and compared; any increase exceeding 40% over the second baseline week or the preceding DBC week was considered a positive food challenge. For the 58 AICAT-positive foods selected from the 19 subjects, 46 were positive on DBC (79.3%) and 12 were negative. For the 56 ALCAT-negative foods, 49 were also negative by DBC (87.5%) and 7 were positive.

Overall correlation between ALCAT and DBC was 83.4%. This suggests that the ALCAT Test was quite reliable in identifying unsafe foods in these sensitive subjects.

45th Annual congress of the American college of Allergy and Immunology, Los Angeles, CA, November 12-16, 1988

Annals of Allergy 1989; 62:253 supplement

http://www.annallergy.org/authorinfol

“Manuscripts are initially reviewed by the Annals Editor-in-Chief. Manuscripts with insufficient priority for publication are declined and returned to the authors. Other manuscripts are assigned to an Associate Editor and sent to expert consultants for peer review.”

Food Intolerance in Patients With Angioedema and Chronic Urticaria: An Investigation By Rast and ALCAT Test.

Lene Hoi MD

The aetiology of the atopic conditions angioedema (AE) and chronic urticaria (Cu) has hitherto been obscure with suggestions to allergy or other hypersensitivity as the cause. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of food intolerance being associated with AE and CU. 52 patients, 39 females and 13 males, with a median age of 48 years (range: 6-83) and a median duration of disease of 6 years (range 1-6 1) were included. The patients, none of them deficient of C1-esterase inhibitor had oropharyngeal symptoms at least twice a month and classical skin eruptions at least twice a week. Follow-up (nm5l) was at least 6 months. The following methods were applied: RAST against .10 airborne and 8 common food antigens, total IgE and eosinophil counts, and the computer controlled cellular test for food sensitivity ALCAT test against 100 foods.

Results: Total IgE and eosinophils were raised in 6 and 3 cases respectively. RAST-airborne and RAST-food were positive in 7 and 4 cases, respectively, and all patients were reactive in ALCAT Test against 8-29 foods. Individual diets comprising ALCAT-non-reactive foods eliminated from RAST-positive foods and food additives resulted in total remission in 45 individuals, remission of AE but not CU in 5, and failure in 1 case. AE being potentially lethal oral challenges were not applied due to ethics.

16th European Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology Madrid, Spain, June 25 - 30, 1995

European Journal of Allergy and clinical Immunology, Volume 50, Number 26, Supplement 1995

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(IS...

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